• 13 - Deep sea sediments

    Calcareous oozes; carbonate saturation, lysocline, and CCD; siliceous oozes, chert, and diatomite; abyssal red clay

    published: 27 Apr 2015
  • Ocean Sediments

    Brief review of the sediments found in the ocean -- their sources, distributions, and relative contributions. Developed for an introductory-level Oceanography Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks

    published: 09 Sep 2015
  • Mike Hall: How to determine climate history from cores of deep sea sediment

    Senior technician and laboratory manager Mike Hall describes work pioneered with Nick Shackleton on the use of mass spectrometers to determine climate change from deep sea sediment cores, containing shells of foraminifera. For more audio and video interview extracts from Mike Hall, visit the Voices of Science website: www.bl.uk/voices-of-science/interviewees/mike-hall.

    published: 18 Jul 2013
  • Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

    published: 09 Feb 2012
  • Ocean Sediments: Earth's Deep Climate History

    Science for the Public www.scienceforthepublic.org "Working Science" mini-documentaries October 2014: Richard Murray, PhD, Boston University and National Science Foundation. Dr. Murray discusses what ocean sediment cores reveal about millions of years of Earth's climate. He explains how the drilling, loading, and analysis of the sediment cores. Dr. Murray is a leader in international research expeditions and the images in this video are mostly from one of his recent ones to obtain cores related to sediments from Asian monsoon system.

    published: 17 Dec 2014
  • 23.4 Ocean Floor Sediments

    23.4 Ocean Floor Sediments

    published: 13 Feb 2014
  • Losoul - Sediments

    Agnostic Rhythm: Deep-Cut Grooves & Low-Slung Soul -----SUBSCRIBE----- Losoul — Sediments Losoul — Imminent EP Label: Another Picture — APP-00 Format: 12”, EP http://www.discogs.com/Losoul-Immanent-EP/release/6186496 Support the Artist - Buy the Music Soundcloud, for Agnostic Mixes: http://soundcloud.com/agnostic-rhythm Hearthis, for Agnostic Mixes: https://hearthis.at/agnostic-rhythm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Agnostic.Rhythm?ref=tn_tnmn * If you are the copyright holder and would like this video removed, please contact me directly and I will be pleased to do so. All recordings @128kbps.

    published: 11 Nov 2014
  • 37) Depositional Environments

    From glacial highs, to abyssal lows, this episode explores the many sedimentary environments and their rock forms.

    published: 26 Nov 2015
  • Climatic Evidence From Sediments - Exploring the Science of Climate (3/5)

    For more like this subscribe to the Open University channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXsH4hSV_kEdAOsupMMm4Qw Free learning from The Open University http://www.open.ac.uk/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science --- What sediment cores from the world's oceans reveal about climate patterns. (Part 3 of 5) Playlist Link - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL83DFCE377A217DD4 Transcript link - http://media-podcast.open.ac.uk/feeds/fsc-exploring-science-of-climate/transcript/fsc01.03.pdf --- For more information about climatic evidence from sediments visit http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/s104.htm

    published: 26 Jul 2011
  • Deepwater sedimentary systems

    Deepwater sedimentary systems.New advances and current trends - Deepwater sedimentary systems Dorrik Stow, professor at Heriot-Watt University standed up for deepwater exploration as one of the main scientific and environmental challenges of XXI century in his conference entitled "Deepwater sedimentary systems: new advances and current trends". This knowledge, according to Stow, has a very important role for environmental control and sustainable resource exploitation because the research in deepwater sediments is a key factor, together with political control (of energy rates of consume, CO2 emissions and the increasing of world population and poverty), for the protection of the ocean. Considering these factors is the only way, according to Stow, to be able to develop a sustainable exploita...

    published: 16 Apr 2012
  • Great Animation Shows How Deep Humans Dug Into The Earth

    Courtesy of Tech Insider --- Extreme Journey to the center of the Earth - Scientific drilling into the Earth is a way for scientists to probe the Earth's sediments, crust, and upper mantle. In addition to rock samples, drilling technology can unearth samples of connate fluids and of the subsurface biosphere, mostly microbial life, preserved in drilled samples. Most of the technology used for drilling come from advances in the oil and gas industry. Scientific drilling is carried out on land by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and at sea by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Scientific drilling on the continents includes drilling down into solid ground as well as drilling from small boats on lakes. Sampling thick glaciers and ice sheets to obtain ic...

    published: 18 Oct 2017
  • Martin Jakobsson explains how to collect sediment cores from the sea floor

    Over 50 sediment cores have been obtained from the seabed in and outside Petermann Fjord, Greenland, during the expedition Petermann 2015. Martin Jakobsson from Stockholm University, explains how to use multicorer, pistoncorer and gravitycorer to retrieve sediment cores from the sea floor. Music: et_ – Kopeika (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://www.vyvch.com/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

    published: 29 Sep 2015
  • Deep Sea Sediment Cores

    published: 04 May 2011
  • Black Sea Sediment Core Sampling | Nautilus Live

    Nautilus Live website: http://nautiluslive.org Nautilus Live on Facebook: http://facebook.com/NautilusLive In this highlight video from August 5th, 2011, watch as the ROV Hercules takes sediment core samples in the Black Sea near Sinop, Turkey.

    published: 09 Jun 2012
  • Oceanography 4 (Marine Sediments)

    published: 31 Aug 2016
  • 27 - Microbial sediments

    Biofilms and microbialites: stromatolites, thrombolites, wrinkle structures

    published: 26 May 2015
  • Ocean Volcanoes May Hold Clues To Alien Life

    Scientists think studying 'extremophiles' in toxic hydrothermal vents could teach us about potential extraterrestrial life. Why Does Deep Sea Life Look So Strange? - https://youtu.be/A23wI4lvCgY Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Get 15% off http://www.domain.com domain names and web hosting when you use coupon code SEEKER at checkout! Read More: What is a hydrothermal vent? http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/vents.html "Scientists first discovered hydrothermal vents in 1977 while exploring an oceanic spreading ridge near the Galapagos Islands. To their amazement, the scientists also found that the hydrothermal vents were surrounded by large numbers of organisms that had never been seen before." Deepest Hydrothermal Vents Teem With Strange ...

    published: 12 Mar 2017
  • Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!

    Check out these top unexplained mysteries of the deep ocean. From strange sounds captured in the deep sea by hydrophones such as the bloop, the train, and julia, to gigantic whirlpools, biggest underwater falls and the milky bioluminescent sea phenomenon. Are deep sea monsters living deep in the ocean? Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "12 Historical Treasures In The Middle East DESTROYED!" video here: https://youtu.be/Nt9mWUpTp1U Watch our "Most HAUNTED Places In The World!" video here: https://youtu.be/h9elrDhft9w Watch our "Most DANGEROUS Religious Cults Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/VTD1qabI3v0 9. Underwater Falls Voted one of the most beautiful places on Earth, Mauritius is an island nation in the Indian Ocean. On the Southwestern tip of the island you...

    published: 05 Sep 2016
  • Ocean Sediments (Part 1): Inorganic & Organic Sources for Oceanic Sediments

    Mr. Lima discusses the sources of oceanic sediments

    published: 29 Dec 2011
  • Deep Sea Sediments Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

    published: 17 Dec 2016
  • Earth.Parts #15 - Relative age-dating of rocks; sediments, superposition, hints of deep time

    Methods of determining the relative ages of different rock formations in the Earth's crust. Please subscribe & share!

    published: 05 Jan 2017
  • 26. Isotope Evidence for Climate Change

    The Atmosphere, the Ocean and Environmental Change (GG 140) Isotopes are used to measure past climate properties. Deuterium and oxygen 18 are the most commonly used climate proxies. Lighter isotopes evaporate more readily from the ocean, so water vapor in the atmosphere is isotopically lighter than ocean water. This vapor gets lighter still as it is transported to higher latitudes while losing mass by precipitation. These processes leave an isotopic signal of temperature and continental ice volume in ice cores and deep sea sediment cores. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Stable Isotopes of Water 09:48 - Chapter 2. Isotope Delta Notation 11:41 - Chapter 3. Isotopic Fractionation 18:08 - Chapter 4. Water Isotopes in Ice Cores 31:14 - Chapter 5. Terrestrial and Deep Sea Sediments 33:44 - Ch...

    published: 05 Apr 2012
  • Cold Seeps in the deep sea

    Even at great depths, ocean floor sediments contain enormous amounts of water that can be forced out of the sea floor by tectonic processes at subduction zones. The water at these cold seeps often contains methane and hydrogen sulfide -- energy sources for specially adapted biological communities. Music: Sebastian Rahe German version: http://youtu.be/PqVbpziRGh0

    published: 07 Nov 2013
  • Download Ocean Chemistry and Deep Sea Sediments Book

    published: 13 Feb 2017
developed with YouTube
13 - Deep sea sediments

13 - Deep sea sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:41
  • Updated: 27 Apr 2015
  • views: 4327
videos
Calcareous oozes; carbonate saturation, lysocline, and CCD; siliceous oozes, chert, and diatomite; abyssal red clay
https://wn.com/13_Deep_Sea_Sediments
Ocean Sediments

Ocean Sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:05
  • Updated: 09 Sep 2015
  • views: 10008
videos
Brief review of the sediments found in the ocean -- their sources, distributions, and relative contributions. Developed for an introductory-level Oceanography Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks
https://wn.com/Ocean_Sediments
Mike Hall: How to determine climate history from cores of deep sea sediment

Mike Hall: How to determine climate history from cores of deep sea sediment

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:39
  • Updated: 18 Jul 2013
  • views: 1220
videos
Senior technician and laboratory manager Mike Hall describes work pioneered with Nick Shackleton on the use of mass spectrometers to determine climate change from deep sea sediment cores, containing shells of foraminifera. For more audio and video interview extracts from Mike Hall, visit the Voices of Science website: www.bl.uk/voices-of-science/interviewees/mike-hall.
https://wn.com/Mike_Hall_How_To_Determine_Climate_History_From_Cores_Of_Deep_Sea_Sediment
Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:59
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2012
  • views: 4171
videos
https://wn.com/Ocean_Floor_Sediments_Demonstration
Ocean Sediments: Earth's Deep Climate History

Ocean Sediments: Earth's Deep Climate History

  • Order:
  • Duration: 17:22
  • Updated: 17 Dec 2014
  • views: 371
videos
Science for the Public www.scienceforthepublic.org "Working Science" mini-documentaries October 2014: Richard Murray, PhD, Boston University and National Science Foundation. Dr. Murray discusses what ocean sediment cores reveal about millions of years of Earth's climate. He explains how the drilling, loading, and analysis of the sediment cores. Dr. Murray is a leader in international research expeditions and the images in this video are mostly from one of his recent ones to obtain cores related to sediments from Asian monsoon system.
https://wn.com/Ocean_Sediments_Earth's_Deep_Climate_History
23.4 Ocean Floor Sediments

23.4 Ocean Floor Sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:04
  • Updated: 13 Feb 2014
  • views: 1640
videos
23.4 Ocean Floor Sediments
https://wn.com/23.4_Ocean_Floor_Sediments
Losoul - Sediments

Losoul - Sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:53
  • Updated: 11 Nov 2014
  • views: 3345
videos
Agnostic Rhythm: Deep-Cut Grooves & Low-Slung Soul -----SUBSCRIBE----- Losoul — Sediments Losoul — Imminent EP Label: Another Picture — APP-00 Format: 12”, EP http://www.discogs.com/Losoul-Immanent-EP/release/6186496 Support the Artist - Buy the Music Soundcloud, for Agnostic Mixes: http://soundcloud.com/agnostic-rhythm Hearthis, for Agnostic Mixes: https://hearthis.at/agnostic-rhythm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Agnostic.Rhythm?ref=tn_tnmn * If you are the copyright holder and would like this video removed, please contact me directly and I will be pleased to do so. All recordings @128kbps.
https://wn.com/Losoul_Sediments
37) Depositional Environments

37) Depositional Environments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:47
  • Updated: 26 Nov 2015
  • views: 17054
videos
From glacial highs, to abyssal lows, this episode explores the many sedimentary environments and their rock forms.
https://wn.com/37)_Depositional_Environments
Climatic Evidence From Sediments - Exploring the Science of Climate (3/5)

Climatic Evidence From Sediments - Exploring the Science of Climate (3/5)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:30
  • Updated: 26 Jul 2011
  • views: 1675
videos
For more like this subscribe to the Open University channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXsH4hSV_kEdAOsupMMm4Qw Free learning from The Open University http://www.open.ac.uk/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science --- What sediment cores from the world's oceans reveal about climate patterns. (Part 3 of 5) Playlist Link - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL83DFCE377A217DD4 Transcript link - http://media-podcast.open.ac.uk/feeds/fsc-exploring-science-of-climate/transcript/fsc01.03.pdf --- For more information about climatic evidence from sediments visit http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/s104.htm
https://wn.com/Climatic_Evidence_From_Sediments_Exploring_The_Science_Of_Climate_(3_5)
Deepwater sedimentary systems

Deepwater sedimentary systems

  • Order:
  • Duration: 58:04
  • Updated: 16 Apr 2012
  • views: 1131
videos
Deepwater sedimentary systems.New advances and current trends - Deepwater sedimentary systems Dorrik Stow, professor at Heriot-Watt University standed up for deepwater exploration as one of the main scientific and environmental challenges of XXI century in his conference entitled "Deepwater sedimentary systems: new advances and current trends". This knowledge, according to Stow, has a very important role for environmental control and sustainable resource exploitation because the research in deepwater sediments is a key factor, together with political control (of energy rates of consume, CO2 emissions and the increasing of world population and poverty), for the protection of the ocean. Considering these factors is the only way, according to Stow, to be able to develop a sustainable exploitation plan for the sea in a "world hungry of energy" where more than 80% of power came from fossil sources. Vídeo disponible en: http://tv.campusdomar.es/en/video/564.html
https://wn.com/Deepwater_Sedimentary_Systems
Great Animation Shows How Deep Humans Dug Into The Earth

Great Animation Shows How Deep Humans Dug Into The Earth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:54
  • Updated: 18 Oct 2017
  • views: 13781
videos
Courtesy of Tech Insider --- Extreme Journey to the center of the Earth - Scientific drilling into the Earth is a way for scientists to probe the Earth's sediments, crust, and upper mantle. In addition to rock samples, drilling technology can unearth samples of connate fluids and of the subsurface biosphere, mostly microbial life, preserved in drilled samples. Most of the technology used for drilling come from advances in the oil and gas industry. Scientific drilling is carried out on land by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and at sea by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Scientific drilling on the continents includes drilling down into solid ground as well as drilling from small boats on lakes. Sampling thick glaciers and ice sheets to obtain ice cores is related but will not be described further here. Like probes sent into outer space, scientific drilling is a technology used to obtain samples from places that people cannot reach. Human beings have descended as deep as 2,080 m (6,822 ft) in Voronya Cave, the world's deepest known cave, located in the Caucasus mountains of the country of Georgia. Gold miners in South Africa regularly go deeper than 3,400 m, but no human has ever descended to greater depths than this below the Earth's solid surface. As depth increases into the Earth, temperature and pressure rise. Temperatures in the crust increase about 15°C per kilometer, making it impossible for humans to exist at depths greater than several kilometers, even if it was somehow possible to keep shafts open in spite of the tremendous pressure. Scientific drilling is interdisciplinary and international in scope. Individual scientists cannot generally undertake scientific drilling projects alone. Teamwork between scientists, engineers, and administrators is often required for success in planning and in carrying out a drilling project, analyzing the samples, and interpreting and publishing the results in scientific journals. Humans have reached the moon and are planning to return samples from Mars, but when it comes to exploring the land deep beneath our feet, we have only scratched the surface of our planet. This may be about to change with a $1 billion mission to drill 6 km (3.7 miles) beneath the seafloor to reach the Earth's mantle -- a 3000 km-thick layer of slowly deforming rock between the crust and the core which makes up the majority of our planet -- and bring back the first ever fresh samples. It could help answer some of our biggest questions about the origins and evolution of Earth itself, with almost all of the sea floor and continents that make up the Earth´s surface originating from the mantle. Geologists involved in the project are already comparing it to the Apollo Moon missions in terms of the value of the samples it could yield. However, in order to reach those samples, the team of international scientists must first find a way to grind their way through ultra-hard rocks with 10 km-long (6.2 miles) drill pipes -- a technical challenge that one of the project co-leaders Damon Teagle, from the UK's University of Southampton calls, "the most challenging endeavor in the history of Earth science." 'A ship flying in space:' Earth seen through the eyes of an astronaut Their task will be all the more difficult for being conducted out in the middle of the ocean. It is here that the Earth´s crust is at its thinnest at around 6 km compared to as much as 60 km (37.3 miles) on land. Drilling all the way to the mantle would also give geologists a look at what they call the Mohorovičić discontinuity, or Moho, for short. Above this mysterious zone, named for the Croatian seismologist who discovered it in 1909, seismic waves travel at around 4.3 miles per second, a rate consistent with those waves traveling through basalt, or cooled lava. Below the Moho, the waves rip along at around 5 miles per second, similar to the rate they travel through a silica-poor type of igneous rock called peridotite. The Moho typically lies between 3 to 6 miles below the ocean floor and anywhere between 12 to 56 miles beneath the continents. This zone has long been considered the crust-mantle boundary, where material gradually cools and sticks to the overlying crust. But some lab studies suggest it’s possible that the Moho represents the zone where water seeping down from the overlying crust reacts with mantle peridotites to create a type of mineral called serpentine. This possibility is exciting, Dick and MacLeod suggest. The geochemical reactions that generate serpentine also produce hydrogen, which can then react with seawater to produce methane, a source of energy for some types of bacteria. Or, the researchers note, the Moho could be something else entirely unknown to science. Music: Land of Giants by Dhruva Aliman https://dhruvaaliman.bandcamp.com/album/road-of-fortunes http://www.dhruvaaliman.com/
https://wn.com/Great_Animation_Shows_How_Deep_Humans_Dug_Into_The_Earth
Martin Jakobsson explains how to collect sediment cores from the sea floor

Martin Jakobsson explains how to collect sediment cores from the sea floor

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:24
  • Updated: 29 Sep 2015
  • views: 946
videos
Over 50 sediment cores have been obtained from the seabed in and outside Petermann Fjord, Greenland, during the expedition Petermann 2015. Martin Jakobsson from Stockholm University, explains how to use multicorer, pistoncorer and gravitycorer to retrieve sediment cores from the sea floor. Music: et_ – Kopeika (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://www.vyvch.com/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
https://wn.com/Martin_Jakobsson_Explains_How_To_Collect_Sediment_Cores_From_The_Sea_Floor
Deep Sea Sediment Cores

Deep Sea Sediment Cores

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:46
  • Updated: 04 May 2011
  • views: 902
videos
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Sediment_Cores
Black Sea Sediment Core Sampling | Nautilus Live

Black Sea Sediment Core Sampling | Nautilus Live

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:46
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2012
  • views: 1162
videos
Nautilus Live website: http://nautiluslive.org Nautilus Live on Facebook: http://facebook.com/NautilusLive In this highlight video from August 5th, 2011, watch as the ROV Hercules takes sediment core samples in the Black Sea near Sinop, Turkey.
https://wn.com/Black_Sea_Sediment_Core_Sampling_|_Nautilus_Live
Oceanography 4 (Marine Sediments)

Oceanography 4 (Marine Sediments)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 46:34
  • Updated: 31 Aug 2016
  • views: 2692
videos
https://wn.com/Oceanography_4_(Marine_Sediments)
27 - Microbial sediments

27 - Microbial sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:27
  • Updated: 26 May 2015
  • views: 1138
videos
Biofilms and microbialites: stromatolites, thrombolites, wrinkle structures
https://wn.com/27_Microbial_Sediments
Ocean Volcanoes May Hold Clues To Alien Life

Ocean Volcanoes May Hold Clues To Alien Life

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:58
  • Updated: 12 Mar 2017
  • views: 88092
videos
Scientists think studying 'extremophiles' in toxic hydrothermal vents could teach us about potential extraterrestrial life. Why Does Deep Sea Life Look So Strange? - https://youtu.be/A23wI4lvCgY Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Get 15% off http://www.domain.com domain names and web hosting when you use coupon code SEEKER at checkout! Read More: What is a hydrothermal vent? http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/vents.html "Scientists first discovered hydrothermal vents in 1977 while exploring an oceanic spreading ridge near the Galapagos Islands. To their amazement, the scientists also found that the hydrothermal vents were surrounded by large numbers of organisms that had never been seen before." Deepest Hydrothermal Vents Teem With Strange Shrimp http://www.livescience.com/17823-deepest-hydrothermal-vents.html "Researchers exploring the seafloor south of the Cayman Islands have discovered the world's deepest-known hydrothermal vents, an underwater hotspot teeming with bizarre shrimp with light receptors on their backs." Just How Little Do We Know about the Ocean Floor? https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/just-how-little-do-we-know-about-the-ocean-floor/ "The entire ocean floor has now been mapped to a maximum resolution of around 5km, which means we can see most features larger than 5km across in those maps. That's the resolution of a new global map of the seafloor published recently by David Sandwell of Scripps Institute of Oceanography in San Diego and colleagues, who used some nifty tricks with satellites to estimate the landscape of the sea floor and even reveal some features of the Earth's crust lurking beneath sea-floor sediments." ____________________ Seeker inspires us to see the world through the lens of science and evokes a sense of curiosity, optimism and adventure. Watch More Seeker on our website http://www.seeker.com/shows/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Written By: Lauren Ellis
https://wn.com/Ocean_Volcanoes_May_Hold_Clues_To_Alien_Life
Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!

Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:50
  • Updated: 05 Sep 2016
  • views: 4660507
videos
Check out these top unexplained mysteries of the deep ocean. From strange sounds captured in the deep sea by hydrophones such as the bloop, the train, and julia, to gigantic whirlpools, biggest underwater falls and the milky bioluminescent sea phenomenon. Are deep sea monsters living deep in the ocean? Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "12 Historical Treasures In The Middle East DESTROYED!" video here: https://youtu.be/Nt9mWUpTp1U Watch our "Most HAUNTED Places In The World!" video here: https://youtu.be/h9elrDhft9w Watch our "Most DANGEROUS Religious Cults Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/VTD1qabI3v0 9. Underwater Falls Voted one of the most beautiful places on Earth, Mauritius is an island nation in the Indian Ocean. On the Southwestern tip of the island you will find a fascinating illusion. When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt deposits creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’. But did you know there are actually real underwater waterfalls? Seven waterfalls have been discovered deep underwater. The tallest waterfall on Earth is not Angel Falls, but an underwater waterfall called Denmark Strait Cataract located in the Atlantic ocean between Greenland and Iceland. It is the world's highest underwater waterfall, with water falling almost 11,500 feet and carries 175 million cubic feet of water per second. It is caused due to temperature differences in the water on either side of the strait. Cold water is denser than warm water. And the eastern side of the strait is a lot colder than the western side. So when the waters meet, the cold water sinks below the warmer water, creating a strong downward flow, which is considered a waterfall. And it's not just waterfalls that are under the ocean. There are huge secret rivers, complete with rapids and islands that flow down the sea shelves out into the desert plains creating river banks and flood plains. Here's a picture of the river Cenote Angelita under the sea of Mexico. These salty rivers carry sediments and minerals and could be vital in sustaining life. The world's sixth largest river, by volume, is below the Black Sea. It is 350 times larger than the Thames and 150 feet deep in places. 8. Milky Sea Phenomenon For over 400 years, sailors told tales of a mysterious event that takes place far out in the Indian Ocean. They would come across miles and miles of milky glowing waters, sometimes stretching as far as the eye could see. In 2005, a group of scientists led by Dr. Steven Miller of the Naval Research Laboratory in Monterey, Calif., decided to take a closer look at this story to see if it was true. They managed to register about 235 observations and get a satellite image that showed an area of low lighting in the Indian Ocean about the size of Connecticut. Their samples that they collected indicated the presence of a type of bioluminescent bacteria in the water, known as Vibrio harveyi. This isn't the same kind of bacteria that you might see in waves that use their bright light to ward off predators. This bioluminescent bacteria may actually use light to attract fish, since its favorite place to live is inside a fish's gut. Scientists' guess is that since they only emit a very faint light on their own, they have to gather together to make an impact. Their collective glow can grow to massive, milky sea proportions when their numbers swell to a huge amount -- think 40 billion trillion. They may also congregate to colonize algae. Sounds like a party! It is still only a guess since Dr. Miller and his colleagues haven't determined exactly what causes the bacteria to gather. 7. Unexplained sounds Of course dark, creepy fog can make you jump at anything that goes bump in the night. But what about things that go "bloop" in the sea? With names like "The Bloop," "Train" and "Julia," the sounds have been captured by hydrophones, or underwater microphones, monitored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The decidedly nonspooky nicknames for these sounds do little to dispel the mystery surrounding them. In 1997, NOAA hydrophones 3,000 miles apart picked up one of the loudest sounds ever recorded off the southern coast of South America: the Bloop (which sounds exactly like its name, a bloop). The Bloop mimics marine animal sounds in some ways, but if it were some kind of sea creature it would have to be almost the size of the Eiffel tower for that sound to be heard from 3,000 miles away. So what made the sound? It's anyone's guess but deep-sea monsters aside, NOAA holds the most likely explanation for The Bloop is that it was the sound of a large iceberg fracturing. Sure.... Another weird noise known as Julia sounds almost like someone whining or maybe even singing under water. The eastern equatorial Pacific autonomous array (the fancy name for the network of hydrophones) picked up this strange sound that lasted 15 seconds in 1999.
https://wn.com/Most_Mysterious_Ocean_Facts
Ocean Sediments (Part 1): Inorganic & Organic Sources for Oceanic Sediments

Ocean Sediments (Part 1): Inorganic & Organic Sources for Oceanic Sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:32
  • Updated: 29 Dec 2011
  • views: 5919
videos
Mr. Lima discusses the sources of oceanic sediments
https://wn.com/Ocean_Sediments_(Part_1)_Inorganic_Organic_Sources_For_Oceanic_Sediments
Deep Sea Sediments Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

Deep Sea Sediments Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:16
  • Updated: 17 Dec 2016
  • views: 65
videos
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Sediments_Volume_63_Developments_In_Sedimentology
Earth.Parts #15 - Relative age-dating of rocks; sediments, superposition, hints of deep time

Earth.Parts #15 - Relative age-dating of rocks; sediments, superposition, hints of deep time

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:18
  • Updated: 05 Jan 2017
  • views: 1241
videos
Methods of determining the relative ages of different rock formations in the Earth's crust. Please subscribe & share!
https://wn.com/Earth.Parts_15_Relative_Age_Dating_Of_Rocks_Sediments,_Superposition,_Hints_Of_Deep_Time
26. Isotope Evidence for Climate Change

26. Isotope Evidence for Climate Change

  • Order:
  • Duration: 47:23
  • Updated: 05 Apr 2012
  • views: 14799
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The Atmosphere, the Ocean and Environmental Change (GG 140) Isotopes are used to measure past climate properties. Deuterium and oxygen 18 are the most commonly used climate proxies. Lighter isotopes evaporate more readily from the ocean, so water vapor in the atmosphere is isotopically lighter than ocean water. This vapor gets lighter still as it is transported to higher latitudes while losing mass by precipitation. These processes leave an isotopic signal of temperature and continental ice volume in ice cores and deep sea sediment cores. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Stable Isotopes of Water 09:48 - Chapter 2. Isotope Delta Notation 11:41 - Chapter 3. Isotopic Fractionation 18:08 - Chapter 4. Water Isotopes in Ice Cores 31:14 - Chapter 5. Terrestrial and Deep Sea Sediments 33:44 - Chapter 6. Oxygen Isotopes in Ocean Sediment Cores 44:08 - Chapter 7. Milankovitch Theory of Ice Ages Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2011.
https://wn.com/26._Isotope_Evidence_For_Climate_Change
Cold Seeps in the deep sea

Cold Seeps in the deep sea

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  • Duration: 9:22
  • Updated: 07 Nov 2013
  • views: 6194
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Even at great depths, ocean floor sediments contain enormous amounts of water that can be forced out of the sea floor by tectonic processes at subduction zones. The water at these cold seeps often contains methane and hydrogen sulfide -- energy sources for specially adapted biological communities. Music: Sebastian Rahe German version: http://youtu.be/PqVbpziRGh0
https://wn.com/Cold_Seeps_In_The_Deep_Sea
Download Ocean Chemistry and Deep Sea Sediments Book

Download Ocean Chemistry and Deep Sea Sediments Book

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  • Duration: 0:22
  • Updated: 13 Feb 2017
  • views: 4
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https://wn.com/Download_Ocean_Chemistry_And_Deep_Sea_Sediments_Book
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