• 13 - Deep sea sediments

    Calcareous oozes; carbonate saturation, lysocline, and CCD; siliceous oozes, chert, and diatomite; abyssal red clay

    published: 27 Apr 2015
  • Mike Hall: How to determine climate history from cores of deep sea sediment

    Senior technician and laboratory manager Mike Hall describes work pioneered with Nick Shackleton on the use of mass spectrometers to determine climate change from deep sea sediment cores, containing shells of foraminifera. For more audio and video interview extracts from Mike Hall, visit the Voices of Science website: www.bl.uk/voices-of-science/interviewees/mike-hall.

    published: 18 Jul 2013
  • Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

    published: 09 Feb 2012
  • Deep Sea Sediment Cores

    published: 04 May 2011
  • Ocean Sediments

    Brief review of the sediments found in the ocean -- their sources, distributions, and relative contributions. Developed for an introductory-level Oceanography Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks

    published: 09 Sep 2015
  • 37) Depositional Environments

    From glacial highs, to abyssal lows, this episode explores the many sedimentary environments and their rock forms.

    published: 26 Nov 2015
  • 23.4 Ocean Floor Sediments

    23.4 Ocean Floor Sediments

    published: 13 Feb 2014
  • Losoul - Sediments

    Agnostic Rhythm: Deep-Cut Grooves & Low-Slung Soul -----SUBSCRIBE----- Losoul — Sediments Losoul — Imminent EP Label: Another Picture — APP-00 Format: 12”, EP http://www.discogs.com/Losoul-Immanent-EP/release/6186496 Support the Artist - Buy the Music Soundcloud, for Agnostic Mixes: http://soundcloud.com/agnostic-rhythm Hearthis, for Agnostic Mixes: https://hearthis.at/agnostic-rhythm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Agnostic.Rhythm?ref=tn_tnmn * If you are the copyright holder and would like this video removed, please contact me directly and I will be pleased to do so. All recordings @128kbps.

    published: 11 Nov 2014
  • 12 - Submarine fan systems

    Autocyclic vs. allocyclic fan processes; effects of sediment supply and source region on fan geometry; contourite deposits

    published: 27 Apr 2015
  • Hydraulic jump, low head dam installation, and coarse sediment transport

    River Geomorphology Video created by Little River Research and Design, with funding from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. http://serc.carleton.edu/details/files/19075.html As the clip opens you see shallow flow with uniform bedmaterial transport throughout. A small low head wier or dam is installed. This produces deep subcritical flow above the dam and critical flow over it. Below the dam we see supercritical flow. The deeper, low velocity flow above the dam cannot move the coarse bedload (Q = VA, and since A is greatly increased and Q is unchanged above the dam, V is greatly decreased) and we see deposition occur until depth is shallow enough (and A small enough) that the increase in V moved bedload again. Deposition occurs to the top of the dam. When the dam is in...

    published: 26 Feb 2010
  • Seafloor sediment coring

    Seafloor sediment coring (water depth: ~200 m)

    published: 23 Nov 2015
  • Black Sea Sediment Core Sampling | Nautilus Live

    Nautilus Live website: http://nautiluslive.org Nautilus Live on Facebook: http://facebook.com/NautilusLive In this highlight video from August 5th, 2011, watch as the ROV Hercules takes sediment core samples in the Black Sea near Sinop, Turkey.

    published: 09 Jun 2012
  • Great Animation Shows How Deep Humans Dug Into The Earth

    Extreme Journey to the center of the Earth - Scientific drilling into the Earth is a way for scientists to probe the Earth's sediments, crust, and upper mantle. In addition to rock samples, drilling technology can unearth samples of connate fluids and of the subsurface biosphere, mostly microbial life, preserved in drilled samples. Most of the technology used for drilling come from advances in the oil and gas industry. Scientific drilling is carried out on land by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and at sea by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Scientific drilling on the continents includes drilling down into solid ground as well as drilling from small boats on lakes. Sampling thick glaciers and ice sheets to obtain ice cores is related but will n...

    published: 18 Oct 2017
  • Martin Jakobsson explains how to collect sediment cores from the sea floor

    Over 50 sediment cores have been obtained from the seabed in and outside Petermann Fjord, Greenland, during the expedition Petermann 2015. Martin Jakobsson from Stockholm University, explains how to use multicorer, pistoncorer and gravitycorer to retrieve sediment cores from the sea floor. Music: et_ – Kopeika (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://www.vyvch.com/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

    published: 29 Sep 2015
  • Oceanography 4 (Marine Sediments)

    published: 31 Aug 2016
  • Deep Sea Sediments Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

    published: 03 Jan 2017
  • Ocean Sediments: Earth's Deep Climate History

    Science for the Public www.scienceforthepublic.org "Working Science" mini-documentaries October 2014: Richard Murray, PhD, Boston University and National Science Foundation. Dr. Murray discusses what ocean sediment cores reveal about millions of years of Earth's climate. He explains how the drilling, loading, and analysis of the sediment cores. Dr. Murray is a leader in international research expeditions and the images in this video are mostly from one of his recent ones to obtain cores related to sediments from Asian monsoon system.

    published: 17 Dec 2014
  • Ocean Sediments (Part 1): Inorganic & Organic Sources for Oceanic Sediments

    Mr. Lima discusses the sources of oceanic sediments

    published: 29 Dec 2011
  • Download Ocean Chemistry and Deep Sea Sediments Book

    published: 13 Feb 2017
  • SANDSTONE, SEDIMENTS AND SWASTIKAS - PNHA GEOLOGY WALK, PART 1

    Doctor Peter Mitchell OAM explains the geology of the Hawkesbury sandstone at Deep Creek near Narrabeen, and a fascinating history written upon it.

    published: 17 Nov 2012
  • Fine Grained Sediments Deep Water Processes and Facies Geological Society special publication

    published: 07 Dec 2016
  • Chapter 12 -- Seafloor Sediments

    LEARN (Live Education Activity Resource Network) with AGU: In this video, Dr. Lawrence Krissek from Ohio State University shows us how students will explore climate history via marine sediments using core photos and authentic datasets in an inquiry-based approach. For more information, see: http://education.agu.org/teachers/learn-with-agu/ All video produced and edited by AGU. Graphics by: http://videohive.net/: Music by: http://audiojungle.net

    published: 07 Jul 2014
  • Vibracoring: Reconstructing the past from Earth sediments

    http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/534 Geologists rely on information from deep beneath the Earth's surface to reconstruct the past. As sediments accumulate over time, they create records geologists use to understand Earth history and to predict future processes and trends. The most common way to get this information is to drill a hole in the Earth where sediments have been deposited over time. The type of drilling tool used for cores depends on how deep and how hard the sediments are. Vibracoring is one of the tools used in shallow coastal areas where sediments consist of soft sand and mud. This video podcast describes how cores are collected in shallow water from the deck of a research vessel using vibracoring. The sediments drilled are recovered in the form of a core that will contain an i...

    published: 18 Apr 2012
  • Deep Sea Lavas Bake Sediments, Add to Warming (Carbon Tax This)

    In a surprise finding, undersea hot lava is baking ocean sediments and releasing greenhouse gases. http://news.discovery.com/earth/deep-sea-lava-climate.html THE GIST * Lava injected into deep sea sediments is baking sediments and driving out greenhouse gases. * The discovery reverses what was thought of as a carbon sink into a carbon source. * Ancient versions of the same situation have been blamed for past global climate changes. One of the places where Nature was thought to suck up and bury atmospheric carbon may actually be doing just the opposite, according to new research on the volcanics of deep-sea ridges. Seismic profiles of the rifting Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California show molten rock from a deep-sea ridge squeezing far and wide as "sills" of magma into th...

    published: 26 Nov 2010
  • VR600 Cleaning of a Service Reservoir showing deep sediment

    published: 16 Jan 2013
  • Deep Sea Sedimentation Controls - Depositional Systems

    Deep Sea Sedimentation Controls - Depositional Systems

    published: 22 May 2017
  • Download Ocean Chemistry and Deep Sea Sediments Book

    published: 13 Feb 2017
  • Deep Sea Sediments, Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

    published: 06 Feb 2017
  • Deep Sea Sediments Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

    published: 03 Jan 2017
developed with YouTube
13 - Deep sea sediments

13 - Deep sea sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:41
  • Updated: 27 Apr 2015
  • views: 3907
videos
Calcareous oozes; carbonate saturation, lysocline, and CCD; siliceous oozes, chert, and diatomite; abyssal red clay
https://wn.com/13_Deep_Sea_Sediments
Mike Hall: How to determine climate history from cores of deep sea sediment

Mike Hall: How to determine climate history from cores of deep sea sediment

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:39
  • Updated: 18 Jul 2013
  • views: 1146
videos
Senior technician and laboratory manager Mike Hall describes work pioneered with Nick Shackleton on the use of mass spectrometers to determine climate change from deep sea sediment cores, containing shells of foraminifera. For more audio and video interview extracts from Mike Hall, visit the Voices of Science website: www.bl.uk/voices-of-science/interviewees/mike-hall.
https://wn.com/Mike_Hall_How_To_Determine_Climate_History_From_Cores_Of_Deep_Sea_Sediment
Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:59
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2012
  • views: 4028
videos
https://wn.com/Ocean_Floor_Sediments_Demonstration
Deep Sea Sediment Cores

Deep Sea Sediment Cores

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:46
  • Updated: 04 May 2011
  • views: 890
videos
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Sediment_Cores
Ocean Sediments

Ocean Sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:05
  • Updated: 09 Sep 2015
  • views: 9188
videos
Brief review of the sediments found in the ocean -- their sources, distributions, and relative contributions. Developed for an introductory-level Oceanography Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks
https://wn.com/Ocean_Sediments
37) Depositional Environments

37) Depositional Environments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:47
  • Updated: 26 Nov 2015
  • views: 15663
videos
From glacial highs, to abyssal lows, this episode explores the many sedimentary environments and their rock forms.
https://wn.com/37)_Depositional_Environments
23.4 Ocean Floor Sediments

23.4 Ocean Floor Sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:04
  • Updated: 13 Feb 2014
  • views: 1548
videos
23.4 Ocean Floor Sediments
https://wn.com/23.4_Ocean_Floor_Sediments
Losoul - Sediments

Losoul - Sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:53
  • Updated: 11 Nov 2014
  • views: 3304
videos
Agnostic Rhythm: Deep-Cut Grooves & Low-Slung Soul -----SUBSCRIBE----- Losoul — Sediments Losoul — Imminent EP Label: Another Picture — APP-00 Format: 12”, EP http://www.discogs.com/Losoul-Immanent-EP/release/6186496 Support the Artist - Buy the Music Soundcloud, for Agnostic Mixes: http://soundcloud.com/agnostic-rhythm Hearthis, for Agnostic Mixes: https://hearthis.at/agnostic-rhythm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Agnostic.Rhythm?ref=tn_tnmn * If you are the copyright holder and would like this video removed, please contact me directly and I will be pleased to do so. All recordings @128kbps.
https://wn.com/Losoul_Sediments
12 -  Submarine fan systems

12 - Submarine fan systems

  • Order:
  • Duration: 13:02
  • Updated: 27 Apr 2015
  • views: 6669
videos
Autocyclic vs. allocyclic fan processes; effects of sediment supply and source region on fan geometry; contourite deposits
https://wn.com/12_Submarine_Fan_Systems
Hydraulic jump, low head dam installation, and coarse sediment transport

Hydraulic jump, low head dam installation, and coarse sediment transport

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:20
  • Updated: 26 Feb 2010
  • views: 102776
videos
River Geomorphology Video created by Little River Research and Design, with funding from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. http://serc.carleton.edu/details/files/19075.html As the clip opens you see shallow flow with uniform bedmaterial transport throughout. A small low head wier or dam is installed. This produces deep subcritical flow above the dam and critical flow over it. Below the dam we see supercritical flow. The deeper, low velocity flow above the dam cannot move the coarse bedload (Q = VA, and since A is greatly increased and Q is unchanged above the dam, V is greatly decreased) and we see deposition occur until depth is shallow enough (and A small enough) that the increase in V moved bedload again. Deposition occurs to the top of the dam. When the dam is installed, we see a classic disruption in sediment transport continuity. Coarse transport essentially ceases through the dam until deposition builds a higher streambed. Sediment is blown out below the dam (often scoured to bedrock in the real world) This is the well known "hungry water" effect seen below dams. At low-water crossings in the Missouri Ozarks, many of which are essentially low dams, we often see this condition, manifested as a wide, sediment-filled channel with low banks upstream of the bridge. This contrasts with a deep, scoured channel below, sometimes with high, unstable banks. At the end of the demonstration, the downstream gate is lowered and a hydraulic jump appears which is then drowned as stage increases. The depositional dune and slipface then move past the dam. The gate is then raised somewhat, allowing a jump to reform and sediment is blown out below the dam.
https://wn.com/Hydraulic_Jump,_Low_Head_Dam_Installation,_And_Coarse_Sediment_Transport
Seafloor sediment coring

Seafloor sediment coring

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:54
  • Updated: 23 Nov 2015
  • views: 378
videos
Seafloor sediment coring (water depth: ~200 m)
https://wn.com/Seafloor_Sediment_Coring
Black Sea Sediment Core Sampling | Nautilus Live

Black Sea Sediment Core Sampling | Nautilus Live

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:46
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2012
  • views: 1117
videos
Nautilus Live website: http://nautiluslive.org Nautilus Live on Facebook: http://facebook.com/NautilusLive In this highlight video from August 5th, 2011, watch as the ROV Hercules takes sediment core samples in the Black Sea near Sinop, Turkey.
https://wn.com/Black_Sea_Sediment_Core_Sampling_|_Nautilus_Live
Great Animation Shows How Deep Humans Dug Into The Earth

Great Animation Shows How Deep Humans Dug Into The Earth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:54
  • Updated: 18 Oct 2017
  • views: 2931
videos
Extreme Journey to the center of the Earth - Scientific drilling into the Earth is a way for scientists to probe the Earth's sediments, crust, and upper mantle. In addition to rock samples, drilling technology can unearth samples of connate fluids and of the subsurface biosphere, mostly microbial life, preserved in drilled samples. Most of the technology used for drilling come from advances in the oil and gas industry. Scientific drilling is carried out on land by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and at sea by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Scientific drilling on the continents includes drilling down into solid ground as well as drilling from small boats on lakes. Sampling thick glaciers and ice sheets to obtain ice cores is related but will not be described further here. Like probes sent into outer space, scientific drilling is a technology used to obtain samples from places that people cannot reach. Human beings have descended as deep as 2,080 m (6,822 ft) in Voronya Cave, the world's deepest known cave, located in the Caucasus mountains of the country of Georgia. Gold miners in South Africa regularly go deeper than 3,400 m, but no human has ever descended to greater depths than this below the Earth's solid surface. As depth increases into the Earth, temperature and pressure rise. Temperatures in the crust increase about 15°C per kilometer, making it impossible for humans to exist at depths greater than several kilometers, even if it was somehow possible to keep shafts open in spite of the tremendous pressure. Scientific drilling is interdisciplinary and international in scope. Individual scientists cannot generally undertake scientific drilling projects alone. Teamwork between scientists, engineers, and administrators is often required for success in planning and in carrying out a drilling project, analyzing the samples, and interpreting and publishing the results in scientific journals. Humans have reached the moon and are planning to return samples from Mars, but when it comes to exploring the land deep beneath our feet, we have only scratched the surface of our planet. This may be about to change with a $1 billion mission to drill 6 km (3.7 miles) beneath the seafloor to reach the Earth's mantle -- a 3000 km-thick layer of slowly deforming rock between the crust and the core which makes up the majority of our planet -- and bring back the first ever fresh samples. It could help answer some of our biggest questions about the origins and evolution of Earth itself, with almost all of the sea floor and continents that make up the Earth´s surface originating from the mantle. Geologists involved in the project are already comparing it to the Apollo Moon missions in terms of the value of the samples it could yield. However, in order to reach those samples, the team of international scientists must first find a way to grind their way through ultra-hard rocks with 10 km-long (6.2 miles) drill pipes -- a technical challenge that one of the project co-leaders Damon Teagle, from the UK's University of Southampton calls, "the most challenging endeavor in the history of Earth science." 'A ship flying in space:' Earth seen through the eyes of an astronaut Their task will be all the more difficult for being conducted out in the middle of the ocean. It is here that the Earth´s crust is at its thinnest at around 6 km compared to as much as 60 km (37.3 miles) on land. Drilling all the way to the mantle would also give geologists a look at what they call the Mohorovičić discontinuity, or Moho, for short. Above this mysterious zone, named for the Croatian seismologist who discovered it in 1909, seismic waves travel at around 4.3 miles per second, a rate consistent with those waves traveling through basalt, or cooled lava. Below the Moho, the waves rip along at around 5 miles per second, similar to the rate they travel through a silica-poor type of igneous rock called peridotite. The Moho typically lies between 3 to 6 miles below the ocean floor and anywhere between 12 to 56 miles beneath the continents. This zone has long been considered the crust-mantle boundary, where material gradually cools and sticks to the overlying crust. But some lab studies suggest it’s possible that the Moho represents the zone where water seeping down from the overlying crust reacts with mantle peridotites to create a type of mineral called serpentine. This possibility is exciting, Dick and MacLeod suggest. The geochemical reactions that generate serpentine also produce hydrogen, which can then react with seawater to produce methane, a source of energy for some types of bacteria. Or, the researchers note, the Moho could be something else entirely unknown to science. Music: Land of Giants by Dhruva Aliman https://dhruvaaliman.bandcamp.com/album/road-of-fortunes http://www.dhruvaaliman.com/
https://wn.com/Great_Animation_Shows_How_Deep_Humans_Dug_Into_The_Earth
Martin Jakobsson explains how to collect sediment cores from the sea floor

Martin Jakobsson explains how to collect sediment cores from the sea floor

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:24
  • Updated: 29 Sep 2015
  • views: 840
videos
Over 50 sediment cores have been obtained from the seabed in and outside Petermann Fjord, Greenland, during the expedition Petermann 2015. Martin Jakobsson from Stockholm University, explains how to use multicorer, pistoncorer and gravitycorer to retrieve sediment cores from the sea floor. Music: et_ – Kopeika (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://www.vyvch.com/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
https://wn.com/Martin_Jakobsson_Explains_How_To_Collect_Sediment_Cores_From_The_Sea_Floor
Oceanography 4 (Marine Sediments)

Oceanography 4 (Marine Sediments)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 46:34
  • Updated: 31 Aug 2016
  • views: 2265
videos
https://wn.com/Oceanography_4_(Marine_Sediments)
Deep Sea Sediments Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

Deep Sea Sediments Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:16
  • Updated: 03 Jan 2017
  • views: 4
videos
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Sediments_Volume_63_Developments_In_Sedimentology
Ocean Sediments: Earth's Deep Climate History

Ocean Sediments: Earth's Deep Climate History

  • Order:
  • Duration: 17:22
  • Updated: 17 Dec 2014
  • views: 355
videos
Science for the Public www.scienceforthepublic.org "Working Science" mini-documentaries October 2014: Richard Murray, PhD, Boston University and National Science Foundation. Dr. Murray discusses what ocean sediment cores reveal about millions of years of Earth's climate. He explains how the drilling, loading, and analysis of the sediment cores. Dr. Murray is a leader in international research expeditions and the images in this video are mostly from one of his recent ones to obtain cores related to sediments from Asian monsoon system.
https://wn.com/Ocean_Sediments_Earth's_Deep_Climate_History
Ocean Sediments (Part 1): Inorganic & Organic Sources for Oceanic Sediments

Ocean Sediments (Part 1): Inorganic & Organic Sources for Oceanic Sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:32
  • Updated: 29 Dec 2011
  • views: 5712
videos
Mr. Lima discusses the sources of oceanic sediments
https://wn.com/Ocean_Sediments_(Part_1)_Inorganic_Organic_Sources_For_Oceanic_Sediments
Download Ocean Chemistry and Deep Sea Sediments Book

Download Ocean Chemistry and Deep Sea Sediments Book

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:22
  • Updated: 13 Feb 2017
  • views: 4
videos
https://wn.com/Download_Ocean_Chemistry_And_Deep_Sea_Sediments_Book
SANDSTONE, SEDIMENTS AND SWASTIKAS - PNHA GEOLOGY WALK, PART 1

SANDSTONE, SEDIMENTS AND SWASTIKAS - PNHA GEOLOGY WALK, PART 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 27:30
  • Updated: 17 Nov 2012
  • views: 1088
videos
Doctor Peter Mitchell OAM explains the geology of the Hawkesbury sandstone at Deep Creek near Narrabeen, and a fascinating history written upon it.
https://wn.com/Sandstone,_Sediments_And_Swastikas_Pnha_Geology_Walk,_Part_1
Fine Grained Sediments Deep Water Processes and Facies Geological Society special publication

Fine Grained Sediments Deep Water Processes and Facies Geological Society special publication

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:16
  • Updated: 07 Dec 2016
  • views: 4
videos
https://wn.com/Fine_Grained_Sediments_Deep_Water_Processes_And_Facies_Geological_Society_Special_Publication
Chapter 12 -- Seafloor Sediments

Chapter 12 -- Seafloor Sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:12
  • Updated: 07 Jul 2014
  • views: 624
videos
LEARN (Live Education Activity Resource Network) with AGU: In this video, Dr. Lawrence Krissek from Ohio State University shows us how students will explore climate history via marine sediments using core photos and authentic datasets in an inquiry-based approach. For more information, see: http://education.agu.org/teachers/learn-with-agu/ All video produced and edited by AGU. Graphics by: http://videohive.net/: Music by: http://audiojungle.net
https://wn.com/Chapter_12_Seafloor_Sediments
Vibracoring: Reconstructing the past from Earth sediments

Vibracoring: Reconstructing the past from Earth sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:49
  • Updated: 18 Apr 2012
  • views: 2194
videos
http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/534 Geologists rely on information from deep beneath the Earth's surface to reconstruct the past. As sediments accumulate over time, they create records geologists use to understand Earth history and to predict future processes and trends. The most common way to get this information is to drill a hole in the Earth where sediments have been deposited over time. The type of drilling tool used for cores depends on how deep and how hard the sediments are. Vibracoring is one of the tools used in shallow coastal areas where sediments consist of soft sand and mud. This video podcast describes how cores are collected in shallow water from the deck of a research vessel using vibracoring. The sediments drilled are recovered in the form of a core that will contain an intact record of the past. Core samples are used to assess the geologic history of an area, such as its geomorphology; coastal, marine, and terrestrial processes; and changes in environmental quality.
https://wn.com/Vibracoring_Reconstructing_The_Past_From_Earth_Sediments
Deep Sea Lavas Bake Sediments, Add to Warming (Carbon Tax This)

Deep Sea Lavas Bake Sediments, Add to Warming (Carbon Tax This)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:29
  • Updated: 26 Nov 2010
  • views: 571
videos
In a surprise finding, undersea hot lava is baking ocean sediments and releasing greenhouse gases. http://news.discovery.com/earth/deep-sea-lava-climate.html THE GIST * Lava injected into deep sea sediments is baking sediments and driving out greenhouse gases. * The discovery reverses what was thought of as a carbon sink into a carbon source. * Ancient versions of the same situation have been blamed for past global climate changes. One of the places where Nature was thought to suck up and bury atmospheric carbon may actually be doing just the opposite, according to new research on the volcanics of deep-sea ridges. Seismic profiles of the rifting Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California show molten rock from a deep-sea ridge squeezing far and wide as "sills" of magma into the layers of ocean floor sediments. The sediments, which are loaded with organic debris, are baked by the magma and so release vast amounts of greenhouse gases. The discovery has big implications for calculating the Earth's current carbon budget, as well as for how past climates were thrown in to disarray by "intrusive" volcanic activity beneath the seafloor -- a place that had always previously been considered a carbon sink, not a carbon source. "It was one of those 'Ahah!' moments," said researcher Daniel Lizarralde of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, describing the discovery of the sills in the seismic data. What especially surprised the researchers was how far the magma sills were located from the narrow ridge where magma is typically found at most ocean floor spreading centers. In the Guaymas Basin the sills of magma were not just a few kilometers (1.8 miles) away from the spreading center ridge, as expected, but up to 50 kilometers (31 miles) away. That vastly increases the volume of sediments the hot rock can cook and from which methane and other carbon-rich gases can be released. Lizarralde and his colleagues published their discovery in the Nov. 14 issue of the journal Nature Geoscience. "Sills derived from intrusive volcanism in sedimentary basins have been linked to huge natural methane fluxes in the past," commented David Goldberg of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. In a separate article in the same issue of Nature Geoscience, Goldberg cites, for example, the 55-million-year-old sills of the Norwegian margin, which is suspected of having caused global climate change. Goldberg also explains that what makes these sills such potent sources of carbon gases is the fact they are buried. Thick blankets of sediment allow the magma to bake the buried organic material at very high temperatures and drive off ten times more carbon dioxide than if the magma had just poured out onto the seafloor. All that gas buoys up through the sediments and into the ocean, heating up the deep waters. Methane that is release can stimulate deep sea biological activity. Exactly how much carbon these sills and others like them in small ocean basins elsewhere are contributing to the atmospheric carbon is still not known, said Lizarralde. For one thing, this is the first place such wide-ranging sills have been discovered. And then there is the question of how much of the carbon-rich gases are recaptured by deep-sea organisms -- and so never reached the ocean's surface. "We don't know how much is immediately taken out by seafloor fauna," said Lizarralde. That will take a lot more deep sea exploration to determine.
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Lavas_Bake_Sediments,_Add_To_Warming_(Carbon_Tax_This)
VR600 Cleaning of a Service Reservoir showing deep sediment

VR600 Cleaning of a Service Reservoir showing deep sediment

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:41
  • Updated: 16 Jan 2013
  • views: 627
videos
https://wn.com/Vr600_Cleaning_Of_A_Service_Reservoir_Showing_Deep_Sediment
Deep Sea Sedimentation Controls - Depositional Systems

Deep Sea Sedimentation Controls - Depositional Systems

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:01
  • Updated: 22 May 2017
  • views: 10
videos
Deep Sea Sedimentation Controls - Depositional Systems
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Sedimentation_Controls_Depositional_Systems
Download Ocean Chemistry and Deep Sea Sediments Book

Download Ocean Chemistry and Deep Sea Sediments Book

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:22
  • Updated: 13 Feb 2017
  • views: 4
videos
https://wn.com/Download_Ocean_Chemistry_And_Deep_Sea_Sediments_Book
Deep Sea Sediments, Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

Deep Sea Sediments, Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:29
  • Updated: 06 Feb 2017
  • views: 3
videos
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Sediments,_Volume_63_Developments_In_Sedimentology
Deep Sea Sediments Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

Deep Sea Sediments Volume 63 Developments in Sedimentology

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:16
  • Updated: 03 Jan 2017
  • views: 60
videos
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Sediments_Volume_63_Developments_In_Sedimentology
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